Author: George Gardner

The RCHAMS (the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments, Scotland) website lists this unhewn olivine monolith as a ‘possible’ standing stone. It is rather curious, and its general size and shape suggest a prehistoric standing stone. It has twelve small connected depressions spread over three of its sides. These have been said to link the stone to astronomical observations and to the noon-day sun height at mid-summer. This would link the stone to life-giving powers, fertility and prosperity. An alternative explanation is that the marks are simply due to weathering over the years.

The Dagon Stone, Hastings Square

In 1821 a local blacksmith attached a round sandstone ball to the top of it with an iron bar. Who or why is unknown. It is 1.6m tall and its original position is also unknown. It used to stand in what is now the main street, at the end of Ranoldcoup Road as shown by an old photograph and was moved to the grounds of Brown’s Institute in 1894. From here it was moved to the green at Burn Road in 1938: (recorded by the Ordnance Survey in 1956), and in 1961-2 moved again to its present position in Hastings Square.

The RCHAMS (the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments, Scotland) website lists this unhewn olivine monolith as a ‘possible’ standing stone. It is rather curious, and its general size and shape suggest a prehistoric standing stone. It has twelve small connected depressions spread over three of its sides. These have been said to link the stone to astronomical observations and to the noon-day sun height at mid-summer. This would link the stone to life-giving powers, fertility and prosperity. An alternative explanation is that the marks are simply due to weathering over the years.

In 1821 a local blacksmith attached a round sandstone ball to the top of it with an iron bar. Who or why is unknown. It is 1.6m tall and its original position is also unknown. It used to stand in what is now the main street, at the end of Ranoldcoup Road as shown by an old photograph and was moved to the grounds of Brown’s Institute in 1894. From here it was moved to the green at Burn Road in 1938: (recorded by the Ordnance Survey in 1956), and in 1961-2 moved again to its present position in Hastings Square.